Romania, an overview

Turism

With Romania lying at a crossroads in Europe, it is easy to reach. Airlines, railways and trans-European roads, as well as waterways connect it to all the cardinal points of the Continent. The harmonious relief, featuring plains, hills and mountains, makes Romania ideal for tourism.

In the Romanian Carpathians, representing an important part of the Alpes-Carpathian-Himalayan chain, mountain resorts offer all it takes for memorable holidays. The towns of Vatra Dornei and Borsa in the north, Slanicul Moldovei, Borsec and Sovata in the center, Poiana Brasov, Predeal, Sinaia, Busteni, Căciulata and Calimănesti in the center-south zone, Muntele Mic, Semenic and Băile Herculane in the south-west, Stâna de Vale in the north-west are only some of the holiday and health resorts in a widespread tourist network providing high-standard accommodation.

Thermal and mineral water springs in Romania represent the most important source of medicinal waters in Southeastern Europe, Romanian  spa resorts being well known for their beneficial effect in various conditions and diseases.

The Black Sea Coast – one of Europe’s widest seacoasts – features 15 resorts spreading over 50 km, each special in its own way, with fine beaches, hotels and health spas.

In the North of the seacoast lies the Danube Delta, the second largest delta in Europe. Unique on the continent, its beauty, the exquisite landscapes and the rich wildlife made UNESCO declare it a Biosphere Reserve. It is the newest and lowest territory of Romania with a relief permanently under change. The minimum altitude is –36 m on Chilia Arm, and the maximum +13 m on the dunes of the Letea Sand Bank. With an area of 2.590 km2, the Danube Delta includes both dry land and swamps with lakes and streams.

In the North of the seacoast lies the Danube Delta, the second largest delta in Europe. Unique on the continent, its beauty, the exquisite landscapes and the rich wildlife made UNESCO declare it a Biosphere Reserve. It is the newest and lowest territory of Romania with a relief permanently under change. The minimum altitude is –36 m on Chilia Arm, and the maximum +13 m on the dunes of the Letea Sand Bank. With an area of 2.590 km2, the Danube Delta includes both dry land and swamps with lakes and streams.

In NW Moldavia, the area known as Bukovina, is famous for the medieval Orthodox monasteries with interior and especially exterior frescoes (Arbore, Humor, Moldovita, Patrauti, Probota, Suceava, Sucevita, Voronet etc.). These masterpieces of art and architecture  are part of Europe’s artistic heritage and were listed in the UNESCO world heritage. A salient example is the Voronet Monastery,  famous notably for two important features of its painting: the specific hue of blue, “Voronet blue,” and the spectacular Doomsday scene displayed on the entire western wall, uninterrupted by any kind of holes, doors or windows.

The wooden churches from Maramures include eight monuments (Barsana, Budesti-Josani, Desesti, Ieud, Sisesti, Poienile Izei, Targu Lapus etc.), also listed in the UNESCO world heritage in 1999.

In Romania there are over 50 castles and citadels such as those of Rasnov, Bran, Hunedoara, Sinaia, Suceava, Neamt, Alba Iulia, Sighisoara - the most beautiful and complete medieval urban center in Romania, etc.; Dacian fortresses in Orastie Mountains (Blidaru, Capalna, Costesti, Luncani Piatra Rosie, Sarmizegetusa Regia – Grădistea de Munte); and palaces (ex: Cotroceni in Bucharest, Mogosoaia, the Culture Palace in Iasi). All these edifices are charged with a powerful history and culture, constituting an open history book for everybody.

The country’s heritage also comprises the cities with their monuments, museums, fairs and botanical gardens, the natural parks, and a large number of picturesque villages, where rural, ecological tourism has developed significantly, with accommodation in boarding houses nested in the middle of wondrous landscapes, and  traditional cuisine.

Relations with tourism authorities in EU countries – the World Tourism Organization, “Die Donau” Association for the Promotion of Tourism in the Danube Countries, the Central European Initiative and the Black Sea Economic Cooperation – receive a great deal of attention.

 

Environment PROTECTION

 

Biodiversity            

Romania possesses the greatest biogeographical diversity in Europe compared to the other EU member and candidate countries. Situated in the geographical centre of Europe, Romania is the only country that has 5 of the 11 biogeographical regions officially recognised by the EU. Two of these regions are only to be found in Romania, namely the Steppic and the Black Sea region.

Romania is renowned for its rich biodiversity. Large, viable and well preserved populations of species which are endangered at European level can be found in here. These include the wolf, the bear, and the Eurasian lynx .

As regards flora, approximately 3630 plant species exist in Romania, of which 23 are declared natural monuments. 

 

Protected areas

By the designation of NATURA 2000 sites in 2000 (namely 273 Sites of Community Importance and 108 Special Protection Areas), the total surface of protected areas increased to 20% of the Romanian territory.

As regards areas of international importance, Romania has a natural world heritage site (the Danube Delta), one geopark (Haţeg County Dinosaur Geopark), 5 wetlands designated as Ramsar sites (the Danube Delta, Small Island of Braila, Mures Floodplain, Dumbravita Fishpond Complex, Techirghiol Lake) and 3 biosphere reserves (the Danube Delta, Pietrosul Rodnei, Retezat).

 

The Danube Delta is a unique habitat, with well over 300 bird species (many of them cannot be found elsewhere in Europe) and a rich wildlife. A bird sanctuary, the Danube Delta is the meeting place of migratory birds coming from Egypt and the Caucasus, from beyond Crimea or from Central and Northern Europe. Some species, like the pelicans, the small and the big egret, white or red doves and others were declared nature monuments. The Danube Delta harbours Europe’s largest pelican colonies. The Council of Europe awarded the European Diploma of Protected Areas to this reserve, which is also known to harbor the largest reeds area in Europe.

The mosaic of habitats existing in the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve is, in fact, the richest in Romania, hosting a great variety of plants and animals.

Rivers and lakes. The Danube is the main collector of the radially disposed rivers, most of which have their sources in the Carpathian Mountains. It is 2860 km long, with 1075 km on the territory of Romania, between Bazias and the Black Sea. The mountain lakes are glacial, volcanic – originating in old craters, or formed by natural dams. The list of natural assets further includes over 2000 mineral water springs, many being thermal and medicinal.

In 2001, the Small Island of Braila became Romania’s second Ramsar site; it is part of the Lower Danube System, a regional complex of ecosystems that support over 1688 plant species and 3735 animal species.

The Black Sea. The 244-km Romanian coastline displays a low shore in its northern part, while in the southern part it features sandbanks and beaches, as well as 40-60-m-high rocky shorefront. At the foot of the rocky shore lie beautiful sandy beaches. Lake Techirghiol, one of the lagoons of the Black Sea, is famous for its therapeutic mud.

The Retezat National Park in the west of Romania is the oldest national park in this country, protected under a law passed in 1935. The park’s 38,047 ha comprise an 1800-ha core area called Gemenele (the Twins). UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) recognized the universal value of the park in 1979, when it was included in the international network of biosphere reserves.

The Retezat National Park is famous for its rich flora. The Park hosts approximately 1190 species of superior plants of the 3450 known in Romania.

The Rodna National Park, established in 1932, is the largest protected area in the northern group of the Eastern Carpathians, stretching over 46,399 ha, with a 900-ha core area declared Biosphere Reserve in 1979 in the framework of UNESCO’s MAB program.

Program of the consular section

08/06/19

Please take note that the consular section of the Embassy of Romania in Lebanon will be closed on Thursday, August 15, and Friday, August 16, 2019.

Thank you for your understanding.

Program of the consular section

07/16/19

Due to the period of legal holidays of the consular staff at the Embassy of Romania in Lebanon, the Consular Section of the Embassy will only process the emergency cases between July 16- August 18, 2019. Thank you for your understanding. …